HEP A Immunization and Other Resources for Preventing a Major Outbreak

Public Health – Seattle and King County continues to expand its campaign to prevent a major Hepititis A outbreak among people living homeless.  We are also expanding our collaboration with homeless services providers to quickly and urgently build awareness for staff and clients about the most important steps that we can collectively and immediately take.  PLEASE share this message and attachments widely within your organization—from executive leaders to program managers to supervisors to front line staff.  And please ensure that the flyers we are including a widely posted.

Flyers to share and reference:

Here are some specific updates that relate to the attached flyers

  1. The list of walk-in, low-barrier sites for homeless residents to receive a Hep A vaccination has expanded.  These flyers provide information on the current sites: Here are 3 flyers that provide the current sites: one for Seattle, one for South King County, and one for East King County.
  2. Reducing the risk of Hep A (and other highly contagious diseases) spreading at shelters and other service sites requires that ALL SITES create and implement a routine cleaning schedule that includes certain disinfection protocols.  So Public Health has created the flyer: Guidelines for Routine Cleaning and Disinfection
    • Note that the routine cleaning practices outlined in the new flyer are different from the much more intensive response that is required at any site has been notified by Public Health that a person with infectious Hep A has likely visited the site.  We have created the Final Hep A Clean Up flyer with instructions for the more intensive clean up.  (Both flyers include specific instructions on safely cleaning/disinfecting when there is vomit or diarrhea present.)
  3. In addition to sharing/following the instructions contained in the routine cleaning flyer and Hep A clean up flyer, homeless service provider agencies can help prevent a major outbreak by making sure staff and clients are aware of the following critical information about cleaning and hygiene:
    • Basic cleaning and hygiene helps prevent the spread of hepatitis A. We recommend that all shelters do the following:
      • Provide convenient handwashing stations with soap, warm running water, and paper towels
      • Ensure all toilets have toilet paper
      • Create, implement, and post a regular cleaning schedule:
        • Hourly: check that bathrooms are stocked with toilet paper, towels, and that warm water is functioning
        • Daily: Clean and sanitize all bathroom surfaces that are regularly touched using soap and water, commercial cleaning spray, and a paper towel, or cleaning wipes
        • If there is vomit, diarrhea or blood, or if you know someone with hep A was at your shelter:
          • Follow full cleaning and disinfection guidelines (see factsheet)
          • Remind staff/volunteers that good hand hygiene is one of the most effective steps in preventing hepatitis A and many other infectious diseases. Consider posting hand washing signage at all sinks. Hand washing should always occur after going to the bathroom, handling laundry, and cleaning, and before eating, drinking, or smoking. Hand sanitizers can be stocked but they are not effective against hepatitis A virus and should not replace regular handwashing.

Thank you for your help in spreading this information and collaborating with Public Health to do all we can do together to prevent an outbreak.  FYI…Check out a Real Change article in 5/1/2019’s edition that provides an overview of these efforts and also lists immunization locations:

2019 April 18 Membership Meeting Summary and CEA conversation materials

Emailing legislators asking them to #BudgetForHousing

Thank you to sixty-three people who joined us on April 18 for our lively meeting, including a walk through the Coordinated Entry For All process and the opportunity to give feedback on what is and isn’t working about Interim Dynamic Prioritization. Coalition staff were pleased to share news that we are hiring for our new Administrative Coordinator position, and invite people to participate in Project Cool (for information about getting backpacks for students who are experiencing homelessness, email Hillary). We sent Hallie, our Member Services Coordinator, off to her new job in Olympia with hearty thanks and well wishes. And, you got LOUD for Housing by contacting your lawmakers in Olympia asking them to #BudgetForHousing! We know that about 40 people used the email action alert during the meeting, and others made calls – thank you!

Materials/Handouts from meeting:

Coordinated Entry for All (CEA) Deep Dive

Joanna Bomba-Grebb from Coordinated Entry For All prepared a chart of how the CEA process, from assessment to housing, currently works. Thanks to staff from member agencies, including Solid Ground and DESC, for attending the meeting to share their perspectives about how each piece of the process actually works day to day on the ground. Our discussion on the process and continuous improvement was still continuing when the meeting ended at 11, so we decided that we will set aside some time at our Thursday, June 20 Membership meeting (9 am -11 am at Southside Commons in Columbia City) to continue the dialogue and allow more time for questions and suggestions, as well as to hear follow up from the critiques articulated by service providers serving single adults and youth and young adults (links to  these letters to All Home Coordinating Board about CEA below). Some highlights from our conversation: 

  • Coalition members asked questions about Diversion, and Joanna clarified that someone is eligible for Diversion if they are literally homeless (staying in a shelter, outside place not meant for human habitation) or fleeing or attempting to flee domestic violence without a safe housing option, or a youth with two weeks or less before they need to leave their current residence.
  • People who are currently housed but at risk for losing that housing should access prevention resources. Prevention resources can be accessed by calling 211, and not by going to a Regional Access Point or talking to a housing assessor.
  • Staff at social service organizations who wish to have access to centralized Diversion funds available through Africatown International must take a Diversion training – more information and registration can be found online: http://allhomekc.org/diversion/#training.
  • Questions about Diversion should be directed to Zachary DeWolf at All Home.
  • Questions about Prevention should be directed to Kimberly Dodds at King County.

Questions from the meeting related to CEA:

  • Transitional Housing: Concerns were raised about families leaving Transitional Housing not having anywhere to go and not being eligible for Diversion funds to help with move-in assistance. Joanna answered that if a family enters a Transitional Housing Program and it becomes clear they will not be able to successfully move into market rate housing, the staff should request a mobility transfer to Permanent Supportive Housing if that level of support is appropriate – more information about mobility transfers is available here. If you have questions about mobility transfers, email CEA.
    • Note: Discussion at our meeting highlighted the fact that many families in Transitional Housing Programs have nowhere to transition to due to the lack of affordable housing, but are not necessarily in need of permanent supportive housing. This discussion highlighted the possibility that it is necessary for move-in or diversion-like funds to be available for families leaving Transitional Housing.
  • Safe Havens were brought up as a possible housing resources for some individuals. Safe Havens in our Continuum of Care are Harbor House with Community Psychiatric Center and Kerner Scott with DESC.

CEA Updates: Joanna let us know that these developments are currently in development at CEA and will be in use soon:

  • An Acuity Review Team (ART) will soon be convening to look at assessments that have been flagged as inaccurate. Individualized Resource Tools will be in use beginning this summer.
    • Description from Joanna: It is still being stood up and is being comprised of Behavioral and Medical health professionals helping to review the vulnerability of households that are flagged as not having their vulnerability reflected accurately through the Housing Triage Tools completed. That group will be looking at all other information available. More information on that function will be added to the CEA website as it is established and available!
  • Individualized Resource Tools are being developed.
    • Explanation from Joanna: The best place to get a sense for what is being developed with the CE Access and Engagement workgroup is slide 24 of these “Dynamic Prioritization” slides from HUD. We are using an Equity Impact Review model process (see example here) to build, test and launch the Individualized Resource Tool with an eye to ongoing learning/continuous improvement. More information on that function will be added to the CEA website as it is established and available!

Feedback from Coalition members about CEA:

  • The name Coordinated Entry For All implies this is something everyone should access, but since  now most people are being served through Diversion it is misleading.
    • Note from Joanna: Diversion is being stood up system-wide across our community and is very much part of the overall coordinated entry system that exists and is expanding. The launch of the Individualized Resource Tool will help to connect the system components. Again, see the Dynamic Prioritization presentation from HUD.
  • Since Interim Dynamic Prioritization, it has been challenging for Rapid Re-Housing programs to receive referrals. This seems to involve the following elements:
    • Because there is no longer banding, and because Interim Dynamic Prioritization is working to identify the most vulnerable families in our community, CEA is now referring very vulnerable families to all housing options and not just Permanent Supportive Housing. Staff may have difficulty following up with families who are highly vulnerable, and/or families may determine that alternatives such as Rapid Rehousing are not good options for them. Who is assessing the implications of this approach? There also may be difficulty in contacting families that are this vulnerable because they do not have working phones or have difficulty making appointments.
    • This continues to be elevated to funders of RRH as RRH resources in the continuum have been difficult to refer to through the Case Conferencing method.
  • Concern that some community-based assessors are not experienced enough at working with high-needs or special populations. There is a need for more assessors to be based at community organizations, so they  know the clients they are working with, or for outside assessors to be highly trained social workers who have experience working with this population.
  • One experienced staff member at a family service provider remarked that although she is very familiar with CEA, and tracks the multiple changes, it was clear how many people at this meeting were hearing information for the first time. She suggested that CEA provide monthly two-hour orientations on CEA for new staff as well as to provide updates on ongoing developments.
  • Multiple people voiced concerns that the VI-SDPDAT tool does not accurately reflect client vulnerability and creates racial disparities. This eventually lead to Interim Dynamic Prioritization, which has helped to address this issue, but concerns remain, since VI-SPDAT is still a large part of the scoring. Youth service providers and adult service providers each wrote letters to the All Home Coordinating Board requesting specific actions to address this important structural problem. You can read the letters here:

Legislative Session Updates shared at 4/18 meeting

Here’s a summary of some of our top priorities that have passed or need attention! As of 4/25 we still need people to speak up and take action with this link: http://bit.ly/budgetforhousing

  • HB 1406/Robinson – allows local communities to retain a portion of the state’s sales tax to invest directly into affordable homes (this is not a new tax, but allowing local jurisdictions to keep some) – This bill/priority is alive, but needs our support! It needs to be funded in the Senate budget.
  • SB 5600/Kuderer (companion to HB 1453/Macri) – reforms evictions & gives tenants more time to pay late rent (from current 3 days to 14 days) – Passed both the House & the Senate! Needs concurrence (back in the Senate to make sure that they agree with amendments the House made), then to the Governor’s office. 
    • Update 4/25 – this has been concurred and will soon be to the Governor’s office!
  • HB 1440/Robinson – Requires 60 day notice of rent increase (currently 30), and no increase of rent during a lease – Passed both the House & Senate and will be signed by the Governor next Tuesday! 
  • HB 1603/Senn – reverses harsh sanctions and time limit policies on TANF. Most notably, it eliminated DSHS’s ability to permanently disqualify families from TANF for repeated noncompliance sanctions, and adds a new time limit extension for homeless families (including those in transitional and supportive housing). 
    • Action: Use this link to thank lawmakers for their efforts in supporting families on TANF
  • Voting bills:
    • SB 5207/Dhingra – requires DOC to notify anybody being released of their right to restore their vote! Signed into law by the Governor and goes into effect 7/28/2019. We’ll share more updates at our May meeting and Voter Registration trainings. 
    • SB 5063/Nguyen – pre-paid postage for all election ballots. Passed in the House & Senate, will soon go to the Governor. 
    • SB 5079/McCoy – Native American Voting Rights Action. Signed into law by the Governor!
  • Budget Items: 
    • Housing Trust Fund – funded at $175M in Senate, just $150M in House. 
    • HEN – funded at $15M in Senate, just $12.7M in House. 
    • $69 million needed to fund HB 1406
    • Action: Email your lawmakers asking them to use the Senate allocations and maximize funding for affordable housing and HEN, as well as support progressive revenue. 

Mi Casa es tu Casa – A night of vibrant Latin Jazz to benefit the Coalition on May 18

Get your tickets today!5-18-17_Mi Casa flier

Mi Casa es Tu Casa, Thursday May 18 at The Royal Room, will be more than just a high-energy Latin Jazz party to benefit The Seattle/King County Coalition on Homelessness.

The Wayne Horvitz/Simon Henneman Quintet opens the evening recreating Marc Ribot’s legendary 2000 release of Marc Ribot y los Cubanos Postizos (Marc Ribot and the Prosthetic Cubans).
The original project was in honor of Arsenio Rodriguez, one of the chief popularizers of the Cuban musical form known as son, who wrote nine of the 10 tunes. Postizos, according to the Miami New Times, “doesn’t so much reproduce Rodriguez’s music as it reimagines it from a decidedly avant-garde perspective.”

As such it’s a fitting project for local luminaries Horvitz and Henneman, both steeped in mainstream jazz and a range of underground traditions, who have a fondness for interpreting the work of fellow genius travelers. Check it out and read on for more artists:

Subsequent sets by Todo Es and EntreMundos Quarteto will ramp up the party. Todo Es plays original material combining Afro-Cuban, Caribbean and Brazilian sounds with contemporary Latin Jazz improvisation. EntreMundos Quarteto features traditional Brazilian music with jazz, funk, soul and world influences.

Listen to Todo Es here and check out this video of EntreMundos Quarteto in studio with KNKX Public Radio:

Tickets for the benefit show are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. Doors open at 6:30, the music starts at 8.

Advance tickets are available at tinyurl.com/musicforagoodcause

Please note: Tickets do not guarantee seating during shows at the Royal Room. For sold out shows standing room may be the only available space. If advanced tickets are sold out, limited tickets will be available at the door on a first come, first serve basis. Please come early to ensure you get a table. Reservations can be made for those who are coming for dinner as well as the show (click here for Royal Room). The Royal Room is All Ages until 10pm.

The Seattle/King County Coalition on Homelessness is a coordinating force on budget and policy decisions which directly affect the lives and futures of people who are homeless and the kind of community we all live in. The Coalition works to protect and strengthen the civil rights and dignity of people who are homeless and poor and promotes housing and human services at the local, state and federal levels.

Move-In Cost Assistance for Homeless individuals and families through CCS Hunthausen Fund

Our friends at Catholic Community Services want to make sure that case managers across our region know about this funding opportunity! Click here for a flyer and read on for details.

Catholic Community Services has funding available for King County, Snohomish County, and Pierce County residents for move-in cost assistance through The Hunthausen Fund. This funding is referral-based; Case Managers will complete the application with potential recipients and send it to us for review. If the individual meets all of the outlined requirements and the application is complete, payment will be made directly to the landlord for First Month/Last Month/Deposit (as funding permits). This source is specifically for individuals and families moving from homelessness into public or private permanent housing. Unfortunately, we cannot assist with move-in for transitional housing at this time.

If you’d like to get more information, please review the Program Overview or contact Victoria Anderson (425) 679-0340 or James Tolbert (253) 850-2505 with any additional questions you may have. Please also feel free to tell members of other agencies, as this funding is available to all service providers’ clients, so long as the individual meets the program requirements. Thank you, and we look forward to working with you to get your clients housed!

January 2017 General Membership Meeting: Accountable WA, Legislative Advocacy

Thanks to those who joined us on Thursday, January 17 for our first General membership meeting of 2017! We had an action packed agenda complete with a call in to Olympia to start off our 2017 legislative advocacy. We were joined by community members from Catholic Community Services & Catholic Housing Services, Crisis Clinic, Friends of Youth, Housing Development Consortium, Jewish Family Services, Low Income Housing Institute, Plymouth Housing Group, REACH, Real Change, Recovery Cafe, All Home, Youth Care, and more! We heard a great presentation, called in to Olympia about legislative priorities, and signed famous Coalition Advocacy Postcards.

Please read on for a summary of our meeting & important actions YOU can take before our next General Membership Meeting on Thursday, February 16th.

Accountable WA, Kelli Smith, WA Budget & Policy Center

As we know, Washington State had one of the most inequitable tax structures in the country, we do not have an income tax and therefore rely on sales tax and property tax to fund vital programs our communities need and to raise revenue. This structure causes people with lower incomes to pay disproportionately more of their income to taxes than people in the highest income bracket.

The WA Budget and Policy Center, working with many organizations, has developed a package of legislation that would fix some of our tax problems, and make it so that people who are earning the least are not contributing the most in taxes (currently people who are in the lowest 20% income group contribute 16.8% of their income as WA state and local taxes, compared to those in the top 1% who contribute just 2.4% of their income to WA state and local taxes).

There are two main goals of Accountable WA, we encourage you to learn more at the links below and click here to view slides of this presentation.

  • Lead with equity by reducing taxes for households making $75,000 or less.
  • Generate $4 billion per biennium in new revenue for schools, other priorities from equitable sources.

Ponder This: 
Have you ever been troubled with choosing between raising property taxes to fund pubic transit, schools, or another important social program? The Accountable WA package has a measure to cap the amount of property taxes that people with household incomes under $75,000 pay: it shuts off property taxes at 2% of household income. It’s AMAZING because the same measures will apply to RENTERS!!! (As you can tell, we’re very excited about this). The gist for renters is that if your household income is under $75,000/year, you can calculate your property tax as 15% of your rent, and if that amount is above the 2% cap of your income, then you get a rebate! More than 40% of Washington homeowners and renters would benefit from this property tax safeguard credit, and then people would hopefully feel like they can vote to fund essential programs through taxes. This is definitely worth calling to your state legislators about 🙂

The proposal is strong and we encourage you to check it out here, visit www.budgetandpolicy.org and www.allinforwa.org For more information!

Legislative Session Highlights & Updates:
The 2017 Legislative Session started on Monday, January 9th. We partner with many organizations for legislative advocacy – check out some of our priority messages below, visit www.wliha.org for Housing & Homelessness priorities & stay tuned for more. Print our postcard to send these priorities to Olympia!

  • Washington Housing Opportunities Act (HB 1570) – prime sponsor: Representative Nicole Macri (43rd LD) – 
    • MAKE PERMANENT & INCREASE funding for housing & homelessness services (HB 1570). End the sunset on all fees. Provide flexibility for local communities; drop the inefficient mandate to use 45% of funds for one purpose.
  • Housing & Essential Needs (HEN), Aged, Blind, & Disabled (ABD), and SSI Facilitation
    • PROTECT elders and people with disabilities, & prevent homelessness. Help people meet their basic needs & access recovery: FULLY FUND Housing & Essential Needs (HEN), Aged, Blind, & Disabled (ABD), and SSI Facilitation. Invest $29.617M to increase the $197/mo. grant to $400 for people eligible for ABD. Invest $1.893M to fund $20/mo. transportation assistance for people eligible for HEN. End the asset limit for ABD & HEN.
  • Source of Income Discrimination – Ban it!
    • ELIMINATE barriers to housing. Ban Source of Income Discrimination so that renters who use housing subsidies and other sources of income support can find and keep homes in their communities.
  • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
    • FULLY RESTORE the TANF grant to its 2011 level & end the asset test. This will increase support for a family of 3 to $562/mo. and allow families with children to save for necessities or a rental deposit.

Take Action this week & next: 

  • Ride the Advocacy Express to Housing & Homelessness Advocacy Day on Thursday February 2nd! Want to join? Let us know by January 27th. Click here for more information.
  • Speak UP in Olympia TODAY (and every day/week throughout this legislative session)
    • Print Advocacy Postcards and share them with people you work with or in communities you are part of – mail them to the Coalition and we will bring them to Olympia in a stack of over 100 on HHAD.
    • Who are your legislators? If you don’t know, click here to find out (all the way from local to federal level). Next step: call their offices and advocate for important bills & budgets!
    • 1-800-562-6000 – Legislative Hotline in Olympia – you can call from 8am – 8pm Monday – Friday, and the kind people on the phone will take your message and give it to your representatives (you can cc the Governor as well!)
  • Homelessness Advocacy 101 workshops: click here to register today!
    • Saturday, February 4: 10:30am – 1pm at the UW School of Social Work
    • Wednesday, February 22: 6-8pm in Ballard
    • Sunday, February 26: 1pm in Bellevue
    • Sunday, March 5: 1pm in Auburn

Prep for our February 16th meeting: 
In February we will be joined by Sara Hoffman from Coordinated Entry for All to have a discussion about the system. We’ll also have a chance to talk about the new All Home Dashboards. Here’s what you can do to prep:

Voting Tips: November 8, 2016 General Election: How to turn in your Ballot & make sure your vote is counted

The Coalition on Homelessness needs YOUR help to make sure that everyone in our community knows how to vote in the November 8th, 2016 General Election.  This year Coalition volunteers and Member Organizations helped register voters at the rate of 1/day – that’s 365 homeless and unstably housed people (123 in June, 242 in the Fall) that are some of those who will be receiving ballots for the General Election! We want to make sure that each person who we registered, and anyone else you work with, know how, when, and where to turn in ballots, as well as what to do if they haven’t received their ballot. PLUS, we want to make sure that everyone votes YES on Seattle Prop. 1 for Mass Transit Now! !

Please share this information and call King County Elections (206) 296-VOTE (8683) if you have any voting related questions.


IMPORTANT ELECTIONS DATES:

  • Tuesday, October 25: Ballots are mailed to registered voters 20 days prior to the election (on Wednesday, October 19).  If you have not received your ballot by Tuesday, October 25, call King County Elections (206) 296-8683. SPREAD THE WORD – put up a sign in your building (write in ballot drop box – there are lots of new ones – closest to you) to alert folks to call King County Elections if they haven’t received their ballot, and to let them know where to drop off ballots near your location. Print these flyers to share information with people you work with!
  • Monday, October 31: In-person voter registration deadline for people not currently registered in WA State.  Your new registration must be received in-person at either the Renton office:  919 SW Grady Way, Renton, WA 98057-2906, or Seattle office: 500 4th Avenue, Room 440, Seattle, WA 98104.
  • Tuesday, November 8:  Election Day! Ballots must be dropped at ballot drop box (by 8pm) or postmarked by November 8, 2016 (if mailing, pay close attention to mailbox pick-up time.

Materials to post & share with people you work with:

Need to read more about your candidates and issues? 

  • King County Elections Voter Guide: You can use the online guide, or paper guide that was sent out. If you or the people you work with need a paper guide, call Elections,  (206) 296-8683, to request one.

HOW TO TURN IN YOUR BALLOT – including new BALLOT DROP BOXES: 

Ballots can either be mailed in (with first-class stamp, postmarked by Tuesday, November 8), or dropped off at a Ballot Drop Box by 8 p.m on Tuesday, November 8. Drop boxes are open 24 hours/day.

There are 43 ballot drop box locations around King County, many are new, help spread the word! Please Click here for a comprehensive map and list of ballot drop boxes around King County.  That page on the elections website will give you a map with markers you can click on for each drop box, below the map is a list of all the locations.

ACCESSIBLE VOTING LOCATIONS: 

If you need special equipment to vote, or you have not received a replacement ballot by election day, you may request a provisional ballot in person at one of these locations. Visit King County Elections for more information and hours.

Seattle Union Station
401 S. Jackson
Seattle, WA 98104

Bellevue City Hall
450 110th Ave NE
Bellevue, WA 98004

Renton – King County Elections
919 SW Grady Way
Renton, WA 98057

Severe Weather Shelter 2016: October 13 – October 18 information

Major rain and windstorms expected to hit Western Washington October 13 – 16, 2016  Two strong Pacific storm systems are expected to affect the area.
Please circulate and share this information with your clients, guests, and people you know who are staying outside and want to find temporary shelter inside from the high winds and major rain. Severe weather shelters tend to be opened in King County when the temperature is below 32*, this weekend the following shelters will be open due to the rain and wind storms.

If these resources don’t work, encourage people to call 211 for other possible options. Click here for more shelter information from 211.

This post will be frequently updated with the most recent information. If you know of new or updated information please contact hillary[at]homelessinfo[dot]org. _________________________________________________________________________

SEVERE WEATHER SHELTERS – Updated 10/17/2016 at 10am
Please share information about severe weather shelters with your clients and the community.  Check back for frequent updates about openings.

SEATTLE:

King County Administration Building Shelter & 420 4th Ave Shelter – expanded capacity (50 additional spots in Admin Building)

  • Location:  500 & 420 4th Avenue Downtown Seattle (Between Jefferson and James)  Line up for the shelter in front of the loading dock garage door at the corner of 4th and Jefferson.
  • Dates open (with expanded capacity): Thursday, 10/13 – Tuesday, 10/18, (Both Admin Shelter & 420 4th Ave open regularly every other night with 50 beds each)
  • Time: 7pm to 6am
  • Capacity: 100 beds in Admin, 50 beds at 420 4th Ave
  • Population: men (pets welcome at 420 shelter)

Seattle City Hall Shelter

  • Location: 600 4th Ave
  • Dates open (with expanded capacity): Thursday, 10/13 – Tuesday, 10/18, (Open regularly with 75 beds every other night)
  • Time: 7pm to 6am
  • Capacity: 81 beds
  • Population: men & women

Seattle Severe Weather Shelter  – PRINT & POST THIS FLYER

  • LocationSeattle Center Fisher Pavilion, near 2nd & Thomas St. South of Key Arena
  • Dates & Time: Closed
  • Capacity: 100 beds
  • Population: Co-Ed Shelter: 18+, no children 
  • Contact for information: (206) 684-0231

EASTSIDE:
Eastside Women’s Winter Shelter – PRINT & POST THIS FLYER
*Note: This shelter is a winter shelter for Women opening for the first night on Saturday, 10/15 and remaining open through much of winter. 

  • Location: Lakeside Christian Church, 701 1st Street, Kirkland, WA 98033
  • Dates open: Saturday night 10/15 – 1/2/2017
  • Time: 8:30pm – 7am, 7 days/week
  • Population: Single Adult Women 
  • Note: Includes Dinner & Breakfast
  • Contact for information: Cynthia: (425) 463-6285 x 106

Eastside Family Winter Shelter – PRINT & POST THIS FLYER
*Note: This shelter is a winter shelter for families opening for the first night on Saturday, 10/15 and remaining open through much of winter. 

  • Location: Redmond United Methodist Church, 16540 NE 80th St, Redmond, WA 98052
  • Dates open: Saturday night 10/15 – open all winter
  • Time: 8:30pm – 7am, 7 days/week
  • Population: Families
  • Note: Includes Dinner & Breakfast
  • Contact for information: Cynthia: (206) 437-7448

SNOQUALMIE:
Valley Renewal Center Shelter (Expanding day center to be 24 hour shelter)

  • Location: 38625 SE River St, Snoqualmie, WA, 98065
  • Dates open: Closed
  • Time: 24-hour overnight, Dinner and Breakfast Served
  • Eligibility: Must have a Snoqualmie Valley Connection, Sex offender check, no background check
  • Population: Single Men; Single Parent Families Headed by Fathers or Mothers; Single Women; Two Parent Families
  • Contact for information: (425) 505 – 0038